“It is necessary, then, that each man should first of all find in the Scriptures that he, through being entangled in the love of this world—i.e. of temporal things—has been drawn far away from such a love for God and such a love for his neighbor as Scripture enjoins. Then that fear which leads him to think of the judgment of God, and that piety which gives him no option but to believe in and submit to the authority of Scripture, compel him to bewail his condition. For the knowledge of a good hope makes a man not boastful, but sorrowful. And in this frame of mind he implores with unremitting prayers the comfort of the Divine help that he may not be overwhelmed in despair, and so he gradually comes to the fourth step—that is, strength and resolution—in which he hungers and thirsts after righteousness.”

—St. Augustine, On Christian Doctrine

Progression